Dec 30, 2012

Picture of the Day: Montreal’s Olympic Stadium

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MONTREAL’S OLYMPIC STADIUM

 

olympic-stadium-montreal-quebec-canada-at-night

Photograph by Alain Carpentier

 

The Olympic Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium in the Hochelaga-Maisonneuve district of Montreal, Quebec, Canada built as the main venue for the 1976 Summer Olympics. The stadium is nicknamed “The Big O”, a reference to both its name and to the doughnut-shape of the permanent component of the stadium’s roof; “The Big Owe” has been used to reference the astronomical cost of the stadium and the 1976 Olympics as a whole.

The stadium is the largest by seating capacity in Canada. After the Olympics, it became the home of Montreal’s professional baseball and Canadian football teams. Since 2004, when the Montreal Expos relocated to Washington, D.C., the stadium has had no main tenant. It currently serves as a 56,040-seat multipurpose facility for special events (e.g. concerts, trade shows), and continues to serve as a 66,308-seat venue for playoff and Grey Cup games hosted by the Montreal Alouettes.

The tower incorporated into the base of the stadium, called the Montreal Tower, is the tallest inclined tower in the world at 175 metres (574 ft). The stadium was designed by French architect Roger Taillibert, and has been cited as a masterpiece of organic modern architecture.

Well over its original budget, the stadium ended up costing $770 million to construct. By 2006, the final cost had risen to $1.47 billion when calculating in repairs, modifications and interest paid out. It took taxpayers 30 years to finally pay off the cost. Pink Floyd attracted the largest ever paid crowd to the Olympic Stadium on July 6, 1977. The event gathered 78,322 fans. [Source: Wikipedia]

 

 

 

 

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