Sep 28, 2015

Controlled Demolition Makes Two 500 ft Chimneys Perfectly Collide and Crumble

Cockenzie Power Station Demolition Scottish power 2015 (2)

 

On September 26th, 2015, ScottishPower carried out the controlled, explosive demolition of the Cockenzie Power Station, comprising the twin chimney stacks and turbine hall.

The highlight of the event was when the twin 149 meter (489 ft) chimneys were detonated, perfectly colliding into each other before crumbling to the ground. Over 160 kg of nitro glycerine were used to demolish the chimney stacks. Approximately 1,500 charge holes were drilled in each chimney.

 

Cockenzie Power Station Demolition Scottish power 2015 (4)

Photograph by ScottishPower

 

According to ScottishPower:

The explosives were designed to blow out the base of the chimneys so they fell towards each other. Both chimneys were demolished simultaneously where they impacted approximately 140m in the air. The 220m long turbine hall was demolished by 120kg of explosives, which were attached to 19 major box columns that were removed progressively within 1 second.
 
The initiation system was fully backed up with double detonators and connectors throughout where separate back up firing lines were run to each chimney. Overall 4,000 metres of shock tube was employed in the demolition project. [source]

 

Cockenzie Power Station Demolition Scottish power 2015 (3)

Photograph by ScottishPower

 

Cockenzie was officially opened on the May 24th, 1968 and has generated more than 150 Terawatt Hours (TWh) in its lifetime. That’s enough to power the average annual electricity needs of more than 1 million homes every year for its 45 years of operation. In total, it is estimated that more than 10,000 people have been employed at Cockenzie, during construction and operation, with many thousands of other jobs supported in the wider supply chain and local area. [source]

 

Cockenzie Power Station Demolition Scottish power 2015 (1)

Photograph by ScottishPower

 

Check out video of the demolition below! Fast forward to 1:27 if you want to see the two chimneys collide and crumble.

 

 

 

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