Jul 7, 2013

Could This Be the 3D-Printed Cast of the Future?

3D-printed-cast-design-by-jake-evill-(8)

Design by Jake Evill

 

Jake Evill wants to use 3D printing to revolutionize the way we treat fractured bones. Instead of the typical bulky, itchy and smelly plaster or fiberglass casts we use today; Evill is proposing a custom, 3D-printed, lightweight, ventilated, thin, recyclable and washable design.

Jake is a recent graduate from the Architecture and design faculty at the Victoria University of Wellington. He majored in media design with a minor in industrial design.

In a recent interview with Dezeen, Jake explains:

“At the moment, 3D printing of the cast takes around three hours whereas a plaster cast is three to nine minutes, but requires 24-72 hours to be fully set. With the improvement of 3D printing, we could see a big reduction in the time it takes to print in the future.”

 

The project was done in collaboration with the University’s orthopedic department. He is currently seeking funding to further develop this exciting concept. For more be sure to visit Jake’s official website below.

[via Dezeen]

 

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (2)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (3)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (4)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (5)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (6)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (7)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

3D printed cast design by jake evill (1)

Design by Jake Evill

 

 

 

 

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