Oct 25, 2011

15 Incredible Vertical Gardens Around the World


Halles Avignon – Provence, Cote, d’Azue | Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC

 

 
Born June 3rd, 1953 in Paris, France, Patrick Blanc is a botanist and creator of the vertical garden. A scientist, working for the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique) since 1982, Blanc’s vertical gardens have taken him around the world, creating incredible works of living art for cities, public buildings, museums, hotels, restaurants, commercial spaces and private residences.

Please enjoy this small sample of Patrick’s phenomenal work, to see his all of his projects, please be sure to visit: murvegetalpatrickblanc.com
 

 

2. Caixa Forum, Madrid 2007


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

3. CapitaLand, 6 Battery Road, Singapore 2011


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

4. Pont Max Juvenal, Aix en Provence 2008


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

5. Hotel Departement Hauts de Seine, Nanterre – Paris 2005


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

Patrick Blanc – Botanist & Artist

 
Education:
Docteur de 3ème cycle (1978), Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6
Docteur d’Etat ès Sciences (1989), Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris 6

Prizes:
Award winner, French Science Society,Botany, 1993
Award winner, Innovation Contest, 1999. Ministère de la Recherche.
Talent d’or 2002 du Sommet du Luxe et de la Création
Virgile prize for the book « Etre Plante à l’ombre des forêts tropicales » 2003
Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, 2005
Silver medal, Architecture Academy, 2005
One of 50 Best Inventions of the Year, Time Magazine, 2009
RIBA Honorary Fellowship (Royal Institute of British Architects), 2010

Other Activities:
Scientific missions since 1972, Scientific publications since 1977
Scientific missions « Canopy Raft » in French Guyana (1989) and in Cameroon (1989).
New plant species discovery and promotion for Horticulture and Botanical gardens.
Lectures at University, leading professor for PhD students.
Invited speaker for radio and TV reports. Many interviews in newspapers worlwide

[Source]

 

 

6. Butterfly Dance, National Theater – Taipei 2009


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

7. Immeuble ICF – Bordeaux 2007


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

8. Icon Hotel, Hong Kong Polytechnic University 2011


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

9. Avlabari Station, Tbilisi, Georgia 2010


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

10. Plaza de Espana, Santa Cruz de Tenerife – Spain 2007


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

Vertical Gardens: A Botanical & Artistic Approach by Patrick Blanc

 

Do plants really need soil? No, they don’t….. The soil is merely nothing more than a mechanic support. Only water and the many minerals dissolved in it are essential to plants, together with light and carbon dioxide to conduct photosynthesis.

Plants in the wild are growing on vertical surfaces

Wherever water is available all year long, as in tropical forests or in temperate mountain forests, plants can grow on rocks, tree trunks and soil-less slopes. In Malaysia, for instance, out of the 8,000 known species, about 2,500 are growing without any soil.

Even in temperate parts of the world, many plants are growing on cliffs, cave entrances, or fallen rocks. On such very steep places grow many Berberis, Spirea and Cotoneaster species. Their naturally curved branches indicate that they originate from naturally steep biotopes and not from flat areas like the gardens where man usually grows them….

Thus, as seen from nature, it is possible for plants to grow on nearly soil-less vertical surfaces as long as there is no permanent water shortage.

Walls and plants, a surprising, though long-lasting combination

Whenever roots are allowed to grow deep inside a wall, they can easily damage the wall and cause its destruction. That is precisely what happened to the Angkor temples.

This root-related damage can be prevented if water is regularly given to plants. Roots are then only spreading on the surface, leaving the inner wall unaffected.

From these observations, and aiming at setting up permanent plant cover on walls with a minimum of maintenance, Patrick Blanc conceived the Vertical Garden.

The core innovation is to use the root ability to grow not only on a volume (of soil, of water, of sand, …..) but also on a surface. Without any soil, the plant-supporting system is very light and thus can be implemented on any wall, whatever its size.

The Vertical Garden can also be set up indoor. Artificial lighting is then usually required. It’s even possible to set it up in fully closed places without any natural light such as underground parking lots.

The plant species selection is set according to the prevailing climatic conditions.

The Vertical Garden is composed of three parts: a metal frame, a PVC layer and a layer of felt. The metal frame is hung on a wall or can be self-standing. It provides an air layer acting as a very efficient thermic and phonic isolation system.

A 1 cm-thick PVC sheet is riveted to the metal frame. This layer brings rigidity to the whole structure and makes it waterproof. A felt layer, made of polyamide, is stapled on the PVC. This felt is rotproof and its high capillarity allow an homogeneous water distribution. The roots grow on this felt.

Plants are installed on this felt layer as seeds, cuttings or already grown plants. The density is about thirty plants per square meter.

The watering is provided from the top. Tap water must be supplemented with nutrients. Watering and fertilisation are automated.

The whole weight of the Vertical Garden , including plants and metal frame, is lower than 30 kg per square meter. Thus, the Vertical Garden can be implemented on any wall, without any size or height limitation.

The Vertical Garden on concrete walls: a shelter for biodiversity and a cleaning system for cities

The Vertical Garden allows man to re-create a living system very similar to natural environments. Its a way to add nature to places where man once removed it. Thanks to botanical knowledge, it’s possible to display natural-looking plant landscapes even though they are man-made.

In any city, all over the world, a naked wall can be turned into a Vertical Garden and thus be a valuable shelter for biodiversity. It’s also a way to add nature to the daily life of city inhabitants.

Besides, thanks to its thermic isolation effect, the Vertical Garden is very efficient and aids in lowering energy consumption, both in winter (by protecting the building from the cold) and in summer (by providing a natural cooling system).

The Vertical Garden is also an efficient way to clean up the air. In addition to leaves and their well-known air-improving effect, the roots and all the micro-organisms related to them are acting as a wide air-cleaning surface with the highest weight to size efficiency. On the felt, polluting particles are taken in from the air and are slowly decomposed and mineralised before ending up as plant fertiliser. The Vertical Garden is thus an efficient tool for air and water remediation wherever flat surfaces are already extensively used by human activities. [Source]

 

 

11. Quai Branly Museum – Paris 2005


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

12. Trio Building, Sydney – Australia 2009


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

13. Qantas Lounge Sydney – Australia 2007


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

14. Astralia, Cite de l’Espace, Toulouse 2005


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

15. Pacha, The Driver, London 2009


Artwork and Photography by PATRICK BLANC @ murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

For more information please visit: murvegetalpatrickblanc.com

 

 

 

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, the Sifter highly recommends:

 
20 Stunning Japanese Gardens Around the World

 

 

 

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